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Report 328, ( March 2000 ) 32 pages

The 2000 Census and State and Local Finance in Michigan

The study identifies 34 provisions in state law where a reference to local government population affects state and local government finance: 11 affect the allocation of state funds to local governments and 22 affect local governments’ authority to raise revenue. The potential changes of the most significance are the provisions in: (1) the State Revenue Sharing Act that eliminate limitations on growth for as many as 1,000 cities, villages, and townships whose population increases more than ten percent between censuses; (2) the Downtown Development Authority Act that could allow Detroit to raise its tax from one to two mills; and (3) the City Income Tax Act that could restrict Saginaw’s ability to levy its tax at a rate higher than that generally allowed other cities.
Report 328, ( March 2000 ) 32 pages

The 2000 Census and State and Local Finance in Michigan

The study identifies 34 provisions in state law where a reference to local government population affects state and local government finance: 11 affect the allocation of state funds to local governments and 22 affect local governments’ authority to raise revenue. The potential changes of the most significance are the provisions in: (1) the State Revenue Sharing Act that eliminate limitations on growth for as many as 1,000 cities, villages, and townships whose population increases more than ten percent between censuses; (2) the Downtown Development Authority Act that could allow Detroit to raise its tax from one to two mills; and (3) the City Income Tax Act that could restrict Saginaw’s ability to levy its tax at a rate higher than that generally allowed other cities.

Stay informed of new research published and other Citizens Research Council news.
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