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May 5, 1942

About Detroit’s Future

A striking — actually alarming — trend is indicated by a map of population changes in the eastern part of Wayne County since 1930. Very clearly, the pattern of population movement has been away from the center of Detroit and toward the outer sections of the City and the suburban municipalities. Being on a percentage basis, the map emphasizes the rate of change, rather than the number of people affected. However, it is the trend which is significant.

In the older sections of Detroit and the down-river communities, some areas have lost as much as 11.4% of their population in the last 10 years. The loss or stagnation is no longer confined “within the boulevard”, but extends roughly to the area bounded by Livernois, McNichols and Conners Avenues plus the south-west area.

Surrounding these declining areas are sections which gained population by as much as 50% during the decade. For the most part these areas were annexed to Detroit during the 1920’s. Beyond these areas, the suburban areas (generally shown in white) had population gains in excess of 50% — ranging up to 500%.

May 5, 1942

About Detroit’s Future

A striking — actually alarming — trend is indicated by a map of population changes in the eastern part of Wayne County since 1930. Very clearly, the pattern of population movement has been away from the center of Detroit and toward the outer sections of the City and the suburban municipalities. Being on a percentage basis, the map emphasizes the rate of change, rather than the number of people affected. However, it is the trend which is significant.

In the older sections of Detroit and the down-river communities, some areas have lost as much as 11.4% of their population in the last 10 years. The loss or stagnation is no longer confined “within the boulevard”, but extends roughly to the area bounded by Livernois, McNichols and Conners Avenues plus the south-west area.

Surrounding these declining areas are sections which gained population by as much as 50% during the decade. For the most part these areas were annexed to Detroit during the 1920’s. Beyond these areas, the suburban areas (generally shown in white) had population gains in excess of 50% — ranging up to 500%.


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